Lessons learned: Case Tiquipaya

LESSON 1
Water rights based on uses and customs can hamper integrated water resource management that also satisfies new and legitimate multiple use needs as a result of the population’s growth.

LESSON 2
In communities where the growing population generates changes on the use of land, conflicts occur due to water access when the systems are not planned with a multiple use vision.

LESSON 3
It is necessary to have a shared vision and not a sector vision to make progress towards multiple uses between the different sectors on the basis of integrated water resource planning.

LESSON 4
To achieve shared planning processes for an integrated water resource management between the different actors it is necessary to attain a balanced empowerment of the different sectors involved.

LESSON 5
The regulations in force and the instruments for its application must support the construction of an integral and fair vision for water use, at social, political and productive levels.

LESSON 6
Integral planning, with strengthened institutions, leads to water use practices that encourage water balance and benefit the environment.

LESSON 7
Drinking water systems meet the population’s needs, but due to the fragmentation level, the committees managing them do not have any influence over the planning, regulatory and local power processes so that access to water occurs in an orderly manner.

LESSON 8
Everybody feels that water is a social, common and life good, which is a starting point for planning processes that reach an agreement in terms of water use and integrated local management.

 

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